Used Bookstores

The Edmonton Book Store

www.edmontonbookstore.com

10533 82 Ave Edmonton, AB T6G 0K1

(780) 433-1781

Alhambra Books 

http://www.abebooks.com/alhambra-books-edmonton-ab-canada/3054340/sf

10115 – 81 Avenue

Edmonton, AB

T6E 1W9

(780)-439-4195

The Book Seller 

http://thebookseller.ca/app/

9562 – 82 Ave. NW

T6C 0Z8

Edmonton, AB

(780)-496-9193

Wee Book Inn Enterprises Ltd

Four Locations in Edmonton

http://weebookinn.com

 

Mandolin Books & Coffee Company

www.mandolinbooks.com

6419 112 Ave NW

Edmonton, AB

T5W 0N9

(780)-479-4050

Bailey Books

http://www.abebooks.com/bailey-books-st.albert-ab-canada/458495/sf

29B Rowland Cres

St Albert, AB

T8N 5B3

(780)-460-6864

The Bookworm

http://www.parkbookworm.ca

62 Athabascan Ave

Sherwood Park, AB

T8A 4E3

(780)-464-5522

SHAVA Bookstore

Grandin Mall,

St Albert, AB

T8N 1B4

(780)-458-4655

Bookwormz Holdings Ltd

https://bookwormzbooks.wordpress.com

3-100 King St

Spruce Grove, AB

T7X 0J6

(780)-962-9686

 Belgravia Books

http://belgraviabooks.ca

(780)-429-1707

Old Strathcona Books

8104 Gateway Boulevard NW Edmonton, AB

T6E 4B1 (780) 436-2665

Community Aids for Independent Living

Earlier this year I fell and broke one of my crutches the gong show that followed was both frustrating and disappointing. I immediately called the government agency that is responsible for purchase of medical equipment.  It took them 6 weeks to get back to me to book an appointment for an assessment.   Because well I have only needed crutches for the last 50 years and you know my condition may have changed and I no longer need crutches, what a joke.

While I was waiting for the government agency to get back to me I contacted the medical supply company where the crutches were purchased well that wasn’t a piece of cake either.  My understanding was that the crutches have a warranty for a specific amount of time and that there is a further weight warranty on the crutches; meaning that if the user is under certain weight and the crutches break then the crutches are to be replaced by the manufacturer.  The medical supply company attempted to contact the manufacturer a number of times but wasn’t successful.

I had to get involved in order for the manufacturer to respond. By the time the government agency responsible for the replacement of the crutches contacted me I had a new pair of crutches replaced by the manufacturer.  Some of you might be saying well what’s the problem you got your crutches and they didn’t cost you anything stop your complaining; well my issues are these; I shouldn’t have had to wait 6 weeks for a call to get an assessment for a new pair of crutches as it was unsafe for me to use the crutch that was broken; I knew about the warranty and was able to assert myself with the manufacturer but there are many individuals that are not aware of the warranty. The irony is that the government program that is responsible for the assessment and replacement is called Community Aids for Independent Living; what kind of independent living can someone with a disability have when they break medical equipment and they need to wait 6 weeks for an assessment; keep in mind that the person who does the assessment may deny payment for the crutches. When you go to the Inform Alberta website the description of the program Community Aids for Independent Living states that “This Government of Alberta funded program assesses and helps people who have a chronic health condition or disability get basic medical aids and equipment.”

To learn more about Community Aids for Independent Living you can visit Inform Alberta at: https://informalberta.ca/public/service/serviceProfileStyled.do?serviceQueryId=5600

Introduction to Mirella Cooks

Welcome to Mirella Cooks; my family is from Altilia, Cosenza in the southern region of Calabria in Italy; a small village called Maione. I was born in Canada however my family kept many of the traditions from Italy and food has always been an important part of my family’s daily life.

Some of the recipes you will find in this book are: Porpette di Pane, Homemade Bread and pasta, desserts like Turdilli, Persica Cookies and more than 100 other recipes that are authentic to the Italian Culture.

You will also find a short lesson in Italian, some of the more common foods that you will find at most Italian meals as well as cooking abbreviations and measurement conversions. When trying the recipes in this book keep in mind that not only is Italian cooking regional but each village may have its own recipe or even pronunciation of the recipes in this book.

I became interested in preparing Italian food when as an adult I went in search of authentic Italian restaurants and realized that there were very few, most Italian restaurants are what I consider inspired by Italian; I have recently heard that even the restaurants in Italy are moving away from authenticity because they want to appeal to tourists. This lead me to research for recipes on the internet and I soon came to the realisation that although there were authentic Italian recipes on the internet that were similar there was no one place that a person could go to get the kind of recipes I enjoy preparing and sharing with family and friends; and so was Mirella Cooks born.

Italian cooking isn’t complicated as most recipes only contain few ingredients, the simpler the better when it comes to Italian cooking. Italians from the region where my family is from rely on good quality fresh ingredients rather than extravagant recipes; some would call it rustic cooking. If you travel through the various regions of Italy you will find that not one region has the same way of presenting or cooking food in fact most villages have their own versions of recipes, very much like the hundreds of dialects spoken in Italy.

Although there are some recipes in this book that may seem difficult they are very simple; the ingredients are readily available at your local grocery store or Italian import store.

Don’t be intimidated to try them; what’s the worst that can happen; you may actually create something that you will enjoy; I encourage you to experiment and make them your own. If you find you are not happy with the outcome try them again. That is how I learned to create most of the recipes in this book.

Keeping in mind that not all of the ingredients in this book originate in Italy they certainly were prominent in the home I grew up in. I hope you have fun and enjoy experimenting. I look forward to hearing about your experiences in exploring the recipes in this book; buon appetito.

Mirella

Mirella Cooks

I recently had the honour of the Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus Association of Northern Alberta using my ebook Mirella Cooks as a fundraising tool.  As a result Mirella Cooks gained a lot of attention in part as a result of print Journalist Cam Tait’s article about the fundraiser in his columns in the Edmonton Sun and the Edmonton Examiner.

My family is from Altilia, Cosenza in the southern region of Calabria in Italy; a small village called Maione. When my family came to Canada they kept many of the traditions from Italy and food has always been an important tradition.

Unfortunately I never did inherit any family recipes so when I became an adult I went in search of authentic Italian restaurants unfortunately none of the restaurant that I have been to have dishes like the ones that my family cooked. I came to the realisation that if I wanted authentic Italian food I would have to cook it myself; this created a problem for me because I didn’t have the recipes. It took me several years to figure out the recipes for the dishes. Initially my idea was to document them for future reference. Then it dawned on me that many people would be in the same position as I was in; so Mirella Cooks was born.

It is difficult for me to choose favourite recipes from my book; but if I had to I would have to say the No Bake Social Tea Biscuit Layered Cake, two ingredient; ten minutes and you have a cake; Lupini bean snack which is not only delicious but a healthy snack as well; and the Polpette Di Pane/Bread Dumplings for the carbs.
I discovered I liked to cook at a very young age; there is nothing quite like a home cooked meal.

I have Spina Bifida and use forearm crutches. I try to give back to the community whenever I can. I have a Facebook page dedicated to providing disability related information https://www.facebook.com/mirellalsacco and a blog mirellamuses.wordpress.com. I believe that if you engage people you enlighten them to become empowered. Engage, Enlighten, Empower.

Mirella Cooks is in ebook format and is available on my website at www.mirellalsacco.com/mirellacooks for $6.

I would be open to other non-profit agencies using my cookbook as a fundraising tool in the future. I would also say that several of the recipes in the book are very easy to make with few ingredients.

Defining Yourself

It has taken me several months to complete this blog post; when I decided I would write about defining oneself I had an internal  struggle because I always strive to be honest however being honest with tact isn’t something I am good at.  There is no guarantee that my words will change your life. Yet it is my hope that you will take away an idea, an incentive, a new way of looking at yourself and the people around you; giving you the benefit of some of my life’s experience in the hope that you might find some of my experiences useful.

Can I as a woman with a disability have it all? For me the question has been at the forefront on my mind most of my adult life.  Most individuals with disabilities have the same desires as all other people. Some might say that people with disabilities couldn’t possibly have it all, so don’t even attempt it or the word cant shouldn’t be a part of your vocabulary; mixed messages. Thankfully, the naysayers are dwindling as society is becoming more enlightened. And I believe that to a certain extent people with disabilities allow those people to dictate what they can and can’t be or do; stop doing that right now.  You have the right to determine your own level of success; every individual will have a different interpretation of having it all. Whatever that level of success may be always strive to be the best you can be, and above all else be happy and try to stay healthy, and remember you will need support from those who are closest to you.

Speaking of naysayers, I remember one occasion in my 20’s I was on a board for a non-profit agency; my first so I was a little naive.   I had made such a good impression on someone that they felt it was appropriate to call me a token cripple.  Don’t ever do that to someone; it will only serve to make you look foolish; as far as I was concerned I was making a mark and impressed everyone else on the board.

Be realistic; I wish I could be a super model but not very realistic of me; crushing I know but I will survive.  I have had several professions in my life from the transportation industry to being a political aid and everything in between.  You could say I have worn many hats and even though I’ve had my share of setbacks including being sabotaged, being true to my self has always been my main objective. True story; I was working with a non-profit agency in which I was tasked with letting individuals with disabilities know about our agency and ultimately introducing myself to them; I decide it was important to do a large mailout; after doing everything involved in getting a mailing ready to be sent one of the staff members offered to take the stuffed envelopes to the mailbox.  The next day the letter carrier returned the mail to us because the envelopes had been placed in the mail box ripped and mangled.  And yes again I say don’t do this to anyone because you are not going to look like a team player to your coworkers.

For people to be happy they must stop trying to meet other people’s expectations about who they should be. They must define their own worth. If you are to define yourself and be successful you need to take risks, be courageous and ignore the fear mongers in order for you to attain that personal success and happiness you deserve.  For me it didn’t happen overnight or by accident.

I may not have to be the smartest or the prettiest. Just be the best me, always put your best foot forward and avail yourself of every opportunity that comes your way. If you’re lucky, you have someone or many individuals in your life who make an impression on you when you’re young and even throughout your life.

Eventually I came to the realisation that I had to figure out what I was naturally good at.   I came up with the idea that I was naturally good at conversations and had common sense and people skills. So I set out to find a way of distinguishing myself.  That is when I decided it was time to throw myself into being a  disability advocate, in the process changing people’s lives one step at a time and having a great deal of success in doing so.  I am not going to name drop or brag about any specific success; it pleases me to know that I had or have had a hand in making things better for someone, even if may not know them personally.  I continue to do this and will likely always consider myself an advocate; there is something very appealing to being able work independently.

Put yourself first; there is no shame in putting yourself first. In order for you to be a success you will need to be at your best emotionally and physically.  Learn that not to live someone else’s idea of what my life should be is okay.

It really is true what they say; do what you love and find a way to get paid for it; make choices that fit your style and natural abilities. It is never too early to have your dreams fulfilled.

Whatever you consider your level of success to be being successful and happy in life takes skill and the willingness to work for it. Whether it be in an employment setting or as a volunteer make yourself indispensable; in our society, success is often considered synonymous with making a lot of money. But not every person is going to climb the corporate ladder or become a multimillionaire. Self-esteem and contentment are achieved by knowing you are making a unique contribution, no matter what you do.

If I were going to give one basic piece of advice I would say in any situation, always strive to become indispensable. Being indispensable gives you job security and will impress the people around you. It also gives you a sense of accomplishment that no one can take away. Feeling needed and relied upon is good for your soul. There are many opportunities like that.

A successful individual is smart enough to understand that meeting the needs of others will get him/her far. It’s important to be the person who is trusted, admired, and who provides something that no one else can. Being indispensable builds skill and it also builds confidence. Confidence builds success; it’s a positive cycle. Life can be treacherous out there, having your ear to the ground and knowing what’s really going on gives you power.

Be fearless and don’t allow yourself to get stepped on. Sometimes you have to speak up because no one else is going to do it for you.

 This may get me into a lot of trouble and some of you may be tempted to challenge me but hear me out then you can go to town with your criticism.  Use your best assets; brains are definitely an asset but brains and beauty are lethal weapons.  When someone complements your good looks give them your brightest smile.  That probably sounds shocking to those living in our current politically correct universe. I remember walking down the hallway of an office building this gentleman was walking in the other direction takes what appeared to be a shocked look at me and said “Why are you so good looking”? To which I replied “I don’t know, you will have to go ask god”?

I understand that we want to be respected for our intellect. Put your best foot forward and use all your God-given assets but be smart and remember you are a whole package. Using your assets means using your brain.

You managed to get your foot in the door now you have to make a good impression so don’t blow the first impression. You only have one chance to make a first impression.

The strong handshake, eye contact, putting away the cell phone, dress appropriately; meaning no sweat pants or ripped jeans.  Something has to set you apart from everybody else.

Knowing your audience, the way you carry yourself is important, speaking clearly.  And I have been guilty of this one; you don’t need use the word like in every sentence.  Don’t be so serious; humour can be an excellent way to make a serious point; steer clear of the angry glare.  Be on time or preferably early for everything.  Carry yourself with confidence, grace and dignity, be kind and keep your word.

You’ve got to be interesting; have information, experiences, work, hobbies and talk about them. Always have an interesting story on tap about current events.

I’ve been very fortunate; when opportunity comes my way, I take the risk; I make myself available to opportunity; although it hasn’t been easy for me.  Keeping in mind that the life span of people with disabilities is extending all the time; you may as well make the best of it.  You can have a journey that’s fulfilling, or you can have a journey that you can’t wait to end. I’m opting for a fabulous journey every step of the way. I’ve always said what’s on my mind. What I’ve learned at this stage in my life is to focus on what really matters. The footprint you leave behind is entirely up to you.   Not everyone will have a mark of worldwide magnitude. You must always attempt to show yourself in the best possible light.  It is more important to do the right thing rather than always being right; keeping in mind that you do the right thing that is right for you. For most people demanding what you are worth may imply demanding a pay raise however demanding what you are worth can also be applied to your value as a friend, sibling and spouse.  Don’t allow yourself to be a doormat.  You are worth more than that.

It would be dishonest for me to promote the fantasy that through hard work and effort every person can have it all. For many these are empty words. The reality is they have families that are not supportive and health challenges to face. However, every person has a passion and a purpose.  If you can’t make your career your passion, pursue your passion when not working. Carve out a block of time that is just for you. You never know when a door will open for you while you are fulfilling your passion. And if the door never opens, you have created a richer life for yourself.  Learn to be good to yourself and always Engage, Enlighten, Empower.

 

The gratification comes in the doing, not in the results, James Dean

As I have mentioned in the past from time to time I would introduce you to guest bloggers well this is one of those times. It is an absolute pleasure to be an outlet for individuals who want the opportunity to tell their stories in their own words.  I remember seeing Quinn Wade a few years ago on Jasper Ave and 104 St in Edmonton near the Sobey’s playing his saxophone; at that time he was in a wheelchair. Read Quinn’s story in his own words.

I was diagnosed with a brain Virus called Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) 25 years ago; it used to be extremely rare back then. These days it’s still quite rare; however a rise in incidents due to the use of a medication by people who have MS has encouraged further research into this virus. In a very small number of people who get it, the virus just arrests itself.  In my case it did that. It usually leaves ongoing issues and disability. In me, it messed up the part of my brain that sends the signal to my legs to make the walking motion, kind of like a cell phone cord that only half works. I was not even moving for at least 6 months. I don’t remember a lot of that time, except that I was told there was nothing they could do. I would live, with whatever damage it left behind, or I would die. The likelihood was the latter. I did live, and I was on crutches for a year before I was in a wheelchair. I had a very good friend who has since passed on who was there when I first landed in the chair He told me point blank “you get a week to cry about it, a week to be mad and grieve. After that, you get no more. Anything you could do on feet, you can do in a chair, and you will.” Adapt or die. It became our motto a week later; he showed up on my doorstep, I was still grieving. Lol he picked me up plunked me in the car whether I wanted to be or not and off we went Lobster fishing of all things Blueberry picking and we did everything. I learned to swim using my arms, I dragged my chair upstairs, went on trains The whole nine yards And I climbed trees and went fishing and did everything everyone else did. I just did it differently. I couldn’t walk but I could play sax. There is a passion on everyone for something. Find a way to do that thing some sing, some paint, some write, some play music, some draw; whatever it is you just can’t not do. Do it. Whether your legs work or not, dance in life. I survived it for too long. One thing nearly departing taught me was that there is a difference between surviving and living. Years went by… I had people tell me I couldn’t do stuff and of course I did it anyway somehow. I feel like my friend looks on me now and I think he would be happy I learned from him about not seeing myself as a victim. The virus returned again a couple of years ago. That, in itself is almost unheard of. Again, it almost killed me. Again, I lived, and I started to heal, and nobody knows how or why. When I started feeling better, I went to visit some friends in California in Sept 2015. It was an environment, where I felt free to be me. My friends are some of the most supportive and non-judgemental people I have ever had the pleasure to know. It wasn’t a big deal to them if my legs worked or didn’t work, as long as I was a decent person and respectful. I’ll never forget it. I was on the pier at Huntington Beach and had my sax with me. I didn’t know if there were rules around where people could jam or not (people jam there a lot because it’s surf city), so I asked one of the security people there He looked at me and said “you aren’t from here are you?” Me: no Him: this is America son. You are free to play wherever you would like. That resonated in a lot of ways. I was free to be me. Nobody cared one bit about my legs not working, or tried to stop me from doing things because I might hurt myself. Everyone trusted that I knew my own body and my own limitations. I played, and my friend taught me to surf, and I swam and went to Hollywood and played in the famous Sound City Studios. I saw Muppet studios and the space shuttle too! And then it happened…. I was at Newport Beach and there was this rope structure thing So of course I had to climb it. My friend noticed my legs were moving but neither of us was sure if it was voluntary. She had faith at that point that I would walk again, and took pictures for me to take back home and see if anyone could figure out what was going on. My friend took that pic and said “I think your legs were moving a bit. Something has changed.” In the meantime, we continued to tour Southern California and sing (badly…I can’t sing) in the car, and I continued to feel better and better and gain more confidence in myself, regardless of what my abilities may or may not be. I won this dance contest in my wheelchair in January 2016 and the tickets were to a show at a local bar so I went. Prior to my trip, I hadn’t really had the confidence to dance at all. But that night I danced in my chair. The bar was not accessible so I dragged my chair down 16 steps to get in and I loved every minute of it At that moment, I accepted that I could dance, and well, in my chair. I could have cared less if anyone thought anything of it. A friend of mine and I tore up the dance floor that night, and then some other people joined in. For the first time in a long time, I felt a full part of society in my own city. So when I started dancing in my chair and having an actual life instead of just surviving…I got more confidence and it just kept going from there. And then there were the frustrating months where I just couldn’t get my legs to do what I wanted them to So when the snow went and May arrived, I wondered…hmmm could I ride a bike? A friend of mine took me up to the bike commuters and, against most people’s better judgement, I got a bike and my brain knew exactly what to do. They say you never forget how to ride a bike and I guess it’s true. Doing that accessed the part of my brain that also remembered learning to walk. My bike; that was the moment of freedom; at first I strapped crutches onto my bike because I was still very unsteady and it was still dicey if the signals to my legs would short out again. Then I moved from that to using a cane. I had this hilarious Charlie Chaplin waddle happening as I tried to relearn how to balance. May 2016 long weekend I was able to walk without walking aids. I started dancing with my cane to regain balance and a couple weeks later tossed the cane only for a bit. I knew my balance wasn’t back and wasn’t sure if I would get tired fast And at times I did and it did hurt No pain no gain. It takes a lot of work people don’t see to regain things that were lost. I know of one other person who also recovered from it, the same thing happened to him I think a number of things contributed to recovery, certainly for me. My mom used to call me a very determined child when I made up my mind about something I wanted to do, usually something I was told I couldn’t. I think we all have a fight for independence inside us, but we live in a world and a system that doesn’t like independence much. It’s easier to say “you can’t” than it is to say “you can” when it comes to ability. It also easy for people to start to believe they can’t do things, or that they don’t know their own bodies best, when we are constantly told by society that they know better that the person living in the body. A ton of healing had to do with music. There are studies out there that attest to music being a healing thing. Things that have changed in my life since walking: That first time I walked into a coffee shop I had been in every day for 14 years and it all looked different. I could reach things; I didn’t have to fight the chairs to get in line. And taking all the paths that I used to use in my chair still because I forget not to, so it’s always the loooong way around and bathrooms! Omg it’s more evident than ever now how screwy “accessible” ones are because I don’t use them now. But man what a pain when I had to and they were supposed to be accessible but met “code” but you couldn’t get in them of close the door. I get annoyed when I see someone who doesn’t need the accessible stall using it. I know how that felt having to wait with other stalls I couldn’t get into free while someone not using a mobility aid took up the only one I could use. I’ll always be annoyed by that. The same with elevators; it bothers me a lot when people who don’t need them crowd in; I feel like it’s taking advantage of their own ability to get on the escalator or take the stairs, and it makes it harder for people who do need it to get around. Taking the bus or the LRT is a whole other world, and I find myself shooing people out of the front accessible seats whether or not someone with a mobility aid is in them in case someone comes on and needs them. I remember when I couldn’t get on buses because people wouldn’t move. I stand on them now wherever possible.

Disability Specific Support Funds (Alberta)

                Disability Specific Support Funds (Alberta)

Cerebral Palsy Association in Alberta

http://www.cpalberta.com/programs-services/funding-requests/

MS Society

https://mssociety.ca/contact-us?gclid=CjwKEAjwu6a5BRC53sW0w9677RcSJABoFn4sSjKTJ6Gv6IJABAJaWdyU_-1A1dJUgZ5ENycV53AP0BoCLqnw_wcB

Children’s Ability Fund

http://childrensabilityfund.ca/subcategory/what-we-do/helping-individuals/3

The Spina Bifida & Hydrocephalus Association of Northern Alberta

http://www.sbhana.org/programs/support-fund

President’s Choice Children’s Charity

http://www.presidentschoice.ca/en_CA/community/pccc.html

Canadian Tire Jump Start Program

http://jumpstart.canadiantire.ca/en

KidSport

http://www.kidsportcanada.ca/index.php?page=chapters

Easter Seals Equipment and Support Services Program

http://www.easterseals.ab.ca/site/OurPrograms/EquipmentAndSupportServices.aspx

The Robin Hood Association

http://www.robinhoodassoc.com/content/1/WelcomeToRobinHood

Make A Wish Foundation

https://makeawish.ca

Sunshine Foundation of Canada

http://www.sunshine.ca/

Rainbow Society of Alberta

http://www.rainbowsociety.ab.ca/

Children’s Wish Foundation

http://www.childrenswish.ca

Residential Access Modification Program (RAMP)

http://www.humanservices.alberta.ca/disability-services/residential-access-modification-program.html

Alberta Aids to Daily Living

http://www.health.alberta.ca/services/aids-to-daily-living.html

Disability Related Employment Supports (DRES)

http://www.humanservices.alberta.ca/working-in-alberta/3159.html

The CTV Good Neighbour Fund

http://www.goodneighbourfund.ca/

SCI Alberta

http://sci-ab.ca/programs_services/sci_strategy

Disability Specific Support Funds (Alberta)

Cerebral Palsy Association in Alberta

http://www.cpalberta.com/programs-services/funding-requests/

MS Society

https://mssociety.ca/contact-us?gclid=CjwKEAjwu6a5BRC53sW0w9677RcSJABoFn4sSjKTJ6Gv6IJABAJaWdyU_-1A1dJUgZ5ENycV53AP0BoCLqnw_wcB

Children’s Ability Fund

http://childrensabilityfund.ca/subcategory/what-we-do/helping-individuals/3

The Spina Bifida & Hydrocephalus Association of Northern Alberta

http://www.sbhana.org/programs/support-fund

President’s Choice Children’s Charity

http://www.presidentschoice.ca/en_CA/community/pccc.html

Canadian Tire Jump Start Program

http://jumpstart.canadiantire.ca/en

KidSport

http://www.kidsportcanada.ca/index.php?page=chapters

Easter Seals Equipment and Support Services Program

http://www.easterseals.ab.ca/site/OurPrograms/EquipmentAndSupportServices.aspx

The Robin Hood Association

http://www.robinhoodassoc.com/content/1/WelcomeToRobinHood

Make A Wish Foundation

https://makeawish.ca

Sunshine Foundation of Canada

http://www.sunshine.ca/

Rainbow Society of Alberta

http://www.rainbowsociety.ab.ca/

Children’s Wish Foundation

http://www.childrenswish.ca

Residential Access Modification Program (RAMP)

http://www.humanservices.alberta.ca/disability-services/residential-access-modification-program.html

Alberta Aids to Daily Living

http://www.health.alberta.ca/services/aids-to-daily-living.html

Disability Related Employment Supports (DRES)

http://www.humanservices.alberta.ca/working-in-alberta/3159.html

The CTV Good Neighbour Fund

http://www.goodneighbourfund.ca/

SCI Alberta

http://sci-ab.ca/programs_services/sci_strategy